Research in the SuperSanctuary

What will you discover?

A Living Laboratory for Conservation Science

The Harris Center’s SuperSanctuary includes 16 hills and mountains greater than 1,500 feet in elevation, 5 lakes over 100 acres in size and 10 smaller ponds, 59 miles of rivers and streams, 13 miles of hiking trails, several scenic roads, and more than 1,600 acres of diverse wetlands including floodplain, swamp, marsh, fen, and wet meadow — much of which are open to conservation research. We also welcome research in conjunction with our many citizen science programs.

Learn how we work with undergraduate researchers, read up on featured projects, browse a list of research needs and opportunities on Harris Center lands, or share your own ideas for science in the SuperSanctuary.

Bird banders examine the wear on a Blue Jay's wings in order to assess its age. (photo © David Moon)

Bird banders examine the wear on a Blue Jay's wings in order to assess its age. (photo © David Moon)

A budding scientist uses a power drill to take a tree core. (photo © Laurel Swope-Brush)

A budding scientist uses a power drill to take a tree core. (photo © Laurel Swope-Brush)

A beaver is photographed by a motion-sensor trail camera as part of a wildlife survey on the Harris Center's Hiroshi Land. (photo © Lizzy King & Josh Dallesander)

A beaver is photographed by a motion-sensor trail camera as part of a wildlife survey on the Harris Center's Hiroshi Land. (photo © Lizzy King & Josh Dallesander)

A family of bears is photographed by a motion-sensor trail camera as part of a wildlife survey on SuperSanctuary lands. (photo © Viktor Rasum & James Fitzgerald)

A family of bears is photographed by a motion-sensor trail camera as part of a wildlife survey on SuperSanctuary lands. (photo © Viktor Rasum & James Fitzgerald)

A Red-Eyed Vireo, banded by biologists in conjunction with the Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship (MAPS) program. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

A Red-Eyed Vireo, banded by biologists in conjunction with the Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship (MAPS) program. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

A team uses a kicknet to sample aquatic macroinvertebrates. (photo © David Moon)

A team uses a kicknet to sample aquatic macroinvertebrates. (photo © David Moon)

Contact Us

For more information on conservation research with the Harris Center, please contact Brett Amy Thelen at (603) 358-2065 or by email.