Field Reports from the 2019 Amphibian Migration

All the Latest on Big Nights, Small Nights, and In-Between Nights

This is the spot for photos and site-by-site amphibian counts from our 2019 Salamander Crossing Brigades. We update this page and our Salamander Crossing Brigade album on Flickr as we receive reports from our volunteers, so if you’ve got photos or counts to share, please send ’em on in!

May 10, 2019

Final Tallies for 2019

A person in a red raincoat holds a spotted salamander. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

In 2019, we had more Salamander Crossing Brigade volunteers than ever before! (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

2019 was another big year for the Salamander Crossing Brigades! This spring, 250 volunteers moved 4,635 amphibians of 14 different species — including 795 spotted salamanders, 807 wood frogs, 40 Jefferson complex salamanders (a species of greatest conservation need in New Hampshire), and 2,536 spring peepers — to safety at 30 different road crossing sites. Our Salamander Brigadiers also discovered 3 new-to-us amphibian road crossing sites that we’ll be sure to add to our map of crossings for next spring. This means that, since 2007, more than 1,150 citizen scientists throughout the Monadnock Region (and sometimes beyond…) have helped an astonishing 47,385 amphibians survive the most dangerous journey of their lives.

In addition, the Harris Center worked with the City of Keene to close the North Lincoln Street crossing site to vehicle traffic on five different migration nights this spring, specifically to ensure the safe passage of migrating amphibians and to provide a safe place for dozens of families to witness the magic of the migration. To our knowledge, Keene is the first — and so far, only — community in the Granite State to have instituted such a measure, though discussions about amphibian road closures are now underway in at least one other local town.

In exciting news, our road closure and amphibian crossing efforts were also featured in the Washington Post!

A "Road Closed" sign and barricade at North Lincoln Street, Keene, NH. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

HUGE THANKS to Keene’s City Council, Department of Public Works, Police Department, and Parks Department for their support in closing North Lincoln Street to vehicle traffic on Big Nights. Because of these road closures, thousands of amphibians survived to breed another year and dozens of families with young children were able to experience the magic of the migration, some for the very first time. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

One mom, who visited the North Lincoln Street crossing with her elementary-school-aged son after hearing that the road had been closed, wrote us to say, “Thank you so much for taking care of the tiniest creatures while teaching the kids to do the same. It’s just incredible…It’s all amphibians all the time in our house now.”

The Peterborough Conservation Commission also took a huge step forward this spring by purchasing new, large, highly visible “Salamander Crossing” signs for the Summer Street crossing site, improving safety for Crossing Brigade volunteers and amphibians alike. Thank you, Peterborough!

Lastly, we identified a record 9 individual spotted salamanders who were moved across North Lincoln Street by our volunteers in 2019 and at least one prior year (including two lucky salamanders who were first helped across the road all the way back in 2014!), 6 additional salamanders who were carried across North Lincoln Street on both their inbound and outbound migration in 2019, and 2 individuals who were moved across Jordan Road in Keene in both 2018 and 2019. You can see photos of all these repeat visitors here.

Visit our Flickr feed for more photos from this season’s Crossing Brigades, and read on for site-by-site details from each crossing, which are listed in alphabetical order by town.

Concord

Two boys wearing reflective vests and holding spotted salamanders. (photo © Amy Cate)

The Deering Crossing Brigade crew in action. (photo © Amy Cate)

Fisk Road. The Concord contingent mostly opted to patrol in the hours shortly before dawn — apparently, they’re early birds rather than night owls! Over the course of four outings, they crossed 3 spotted salamanders (+2 dead), 2 newts (+1 dead), 1 four-toed salamander, 9 wood frogs (+15 dead), 6 spring peepers (+5 dead), and 1 green frog. Total: 22 live + 23 dead.

Deering

Route 149. Together, a mother, her sons, and a friend saved 67 amphibians on a single night in Deering. Their tallies include 22 spotted salamanders (+13 dead), 1 newt, 4 red-backed salamanders, 37 spring peepers (+20 dead), 2 green frogs, and 1 bullfrog, and 10 unidentified roadkilled amphibians. Total: 67 live + 43 dead.

Derry

Warner Hill Road. In a single night, one family of frog lovers in Derry crossed 1 wood frog, 1 green frog, and 3 gray tree frogs, and counted 1 dead bullfrog. Total: 5 live + 1 dead.

A woman in a reflective vest and rain jacket smiles while holding a spotted salamander. (photo © Abigail Touchet)

Salamanders make people smile.
(photo © Abigail Touchet)

Dunbarton

Robert Rogers Road. Working solo on three separate nights, one dedicated new Brigadier crossed 2 four-toed salamanders (+1 dead), 5 wood frogs, 20 spring peepers (+6 dead), and 2 green frogs (+1 dead), and noted 1 dead spotted salamander and 7 unidentified roadkilled amphibians. Total: 29 live + 16 dead.

Gilsum

Hammond Hollow. While passing through Hammond Hollow on a rainy night, one Friend of the Four-Footed crossed 2 spotted salamanders. Total: 2 live.

Hancock

Antrim Road. In one night, a fantastic family of nature lovers crossed 1 spotted salamander, 2 newts (+3 dead), 3 red-backed salamanders, 1 two-lined salamander, 10 spring peepers (+3 dead), 1 pickerel frog, and 3 green frogs. Total: 21 live + 6 dead.

Route 123. A dedicated solo Brigadier crossed 5 spotted salamanders and, sadly, noted 16 dead on several late-night forays along Route 123. Total: 5 live + 16 dead. This site use more help in 2020, but note that it is not family-friendly!

A hand holds a small spotted salamander. (photo © Sarah Murphy)

Mr. Adorable. (photo © Sarah Murphy)

Harrisville

Breed Road. Several Brigadiers over the course of several evenings moved 51 amphibians to safety at a number of different spots along Breed Road. Their counts include 15 spotted salamanders (+1 dead), 3 newts (+6 dead), 1 four-toed salamander, 3 red-backed salamanders, 1 dusky salamander, 1 two-lined salamander, 2 wood frogs (+2 dead), 11 spring peepers (+1 dead), 2 pickerel frogs, 12 American toads (+3 dead), and 4 unidentified dead amphibians. Total: 51 live + 17 dead.

Chesham Road. Unable to pass up any opportunity to help, one volunteer moved 18 amphibians to safety over the course of several late nights while on her way home from other crossing sites. Her tallies included 13 spotted salamanders (+6 dead), 1 Jefferson complex salamander, 1 wood frog, and 3 American toads (+2 dead). Many more dead went uncounted. Total: 18 live + 8 dead.

Nelson Road. Over the course of several late nights, that same solo Brigadier rescued 7 spotted salamanders while passing through Nelson Road. Total: 7 live spotties.

Keene

A person in raingear and wearing a headlamp stoops on a dark road to pick up a frog. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

A rare quiet moment at North Lincoln Street.
(photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

Eastern Avenue. The numbers are dishearteningly skewed the wrong way on this heavily trafficked thoroughfare. In 4 hours spread out across several different evenings, brave Brigadiers moved 32 live frogs across Eastern Avenue, and counted a dismaying 77 dead. Their tallies include 28 wood frogs (+52 dead) and 4 spring peepers (+25 dead), though many casualties went uncounted. Total: 32 live + 77 dead.

Jordan Road. The dedicated Jordan Road crew racked up an impressive 56 volunteer-hours crossing critters over the course of eight nights. Collectively, they moved 109 amphibians to safety, including 31 spotted salamanders (+2 dead), 21 Jefferson complex salamanders, 3 newts (+2 dead), 18 red-backed salamanders (+2 dead), 3 two-lined salamanders, 15 wood frogs (+2 dead), 10 spring peepers (+6 dead), 1 pickerel frog, 4 American toads, and 3 gray tree frogs. Total: 109 live + 14 dead.

Three different photos of the same spotted salamander, taken in 2014, 2016, and 2019, respectively.

This spotted salamander was moved across North Lincoln Street by Salamander Brigade volunteers in 2014, 2016, and 2019, as verified by its one-of-a-kind spot pattern. Visit us on Flickr for larger versions of this and other photos of uniquely identified spotted salamanders.

North Lincoln Street. Undoubtedly due to the City of Keene closing the road on Big Nights (and publicizing it well!), North Lincoln Street has become the Monadnock Region’s most well-attended amphibian crossing site. In 2019, scores of volunteers — including dozens of families with kids as young as 3 — carefully crossed a total of 1,592 amphibians and counted 68 dead (on nights when the road was open to traffic) over the course of five Big Nights and a handful of Small Nights. Volunteer-hours were difficult to calculate for this bustling site, but they easily topped 200. Critter counts includes 58 spotted salamanders, 2 dead newts, 6 red-backed salamanders (+1 dead), 509 wood frogs (+6 dead), 975 spring peepers (+49 dead), 1 bullfrog, 37 American toads (+1 dead), 6 gray tree frogs, and 9 unidentified dead amphibians. Total: 1,592 live + 68 dead.

Milford-Mont Vernon

Route 13. A mother-daughter team sleuthed out a new site where the amphibians definitely need helping hands. In two nights, the dynamic duo crossed 1 spotted salamander (+1 dead), 3 wood frogs (+25 dead), 8 spring peepers (+25 dead), 8 pickerel frogs (+6 dead), 1 green frog (+1 dead), and 6 American toads (+3 dead). Total: 27 live + 61 dead.

Nelson

A man in a reflective vest smiles while holding a spotted salamander. (photo © Janessa Palmer)

A sweet new discovery on Granite Lake Road in Nelson. (photo © Janessa Palmer)

Granite Lake Road. A pair of enthusiastic amphibian investigators discovered a hot new site on Granite Lake Road, in front of the Nelson School. In only two outings, this terrific twosome crossed 21 spotted salamanders (+8 dead), 1 newt (+4 dead), 1 four-toed salamander, 3 red-backed salamanders, 6 two-lined salamanders (+2 dead), 2 wood frogs, 104 spring peepers (+49 dead), 20 green frogs (+4 dead), 7 American toads (+1 dead), and 7 unidentified roadkills. Total: 165 live + 75 dead. This is a site to watch for future years!

Nelson Road. In four night-time forays, the hearty Nelson Road crew crossed 19 spotted salamanders, 1 newt (+10 dead), 20 wood frogs (+2 dead), 209 spring peepers (+35 dead), 1 green frog, 2 bullfrogs, and 2 American toads (+1 dead). Total: 254 live + 48 dead.

New Boston

Old Coach Road. Over the course of three nights, the New Boston Brigadiers moved 23 spotted salamanders and 1 wood frog to safety at Old Coach Road. Total: 24 live.

Newmarket

A person in raingear and a reflect vest holds a spotted salamander cupped in two hands. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

That smile, tho. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

Lubberland Creek Preserve. This is not even remotely close to the Monadnock Region, but it was reported to us, so we’ll share it anyway! A frog-loving family spent a night on Bay Road in TNC’s Lubberland Creek Preseve, and crossed 11 spotted salamanders, 3 newts, 4 red-backed salamanders, 2 two-lined salamanders, 3 spring peepers, 2 bullfrogs, 4 American toads, and 2 gray tree frogs. Total: 31 live.

Newport

Oak Street. During the course of two rainy nights, a mother-daughter team of longtime Crossing Brigadiers crossed 2 spotted salamanders, 1 wood frog, and 29 spring peepers (+4 dead), and counted 1 unidentified dead critter. Total: 32 live + 5 dead.

Peterborough

Six people wearing reflective vests and carrying flashlights stand next to a sign that says, "Caution Salamander Crossing." (photo © Sarah Murphy)

THANK YOU to the Peterborough Conservation Commission for these fantastic new signs for the Summer Street crossing! There’s no question that the signs improved safety at the site, for volunteers and amphibians alike. (photo © Sarah Murphy)

Summer Street.  Over eight different rain events, the amazing Crossing Brigadiers of Summer Street amassed 65 volunteer-hours moving an impressive 498 amphibians to safety, including 119 spotted salamanders (+11 dead), 4 newts (+4 dead), 1 four-toed salamander, 1 red-backed salamander, 38 wood frogs (+21 dead), 300 spring peepers (+121 dead), 3 pickerel frogs (+2 dead), 14 green frogs (+6 dead), 4 bullfrogs, 13 American toads (+4 dead), and 1 gray tree frog. They also counted 6 individuals that they couldn’t identify. Tremendous thanks to the Peterborough Conservation Commission for purchasing eye-catching new “Salamander Crossing” and “Volunteers Ahead” road signs for this site! Total: 498 live + 175 dead.

Richmond

Fish Hatchery Road. A solo Brigadier explored a new site near his home over the course of three late nights, crossing 1 spotted salamander (+1 dead), 3 red-backed salamanders, 4 wood frogs, 14 spring peepers, and 1 gray tree frog. Total: 23 live + 1 dead.

Rindge

A toad pauses in a road. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

American toads: gruff, yet endearing.
(photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

Old Ashburnham Road. In one night out, a terrific twosome crossed 5 spring peepers, 1 green frog, and 1 American toad, and counted 2 unidentified dead amphibians. Total: 7 live + 2 dead. 

Old New Ipswich Road. The indomitable Rindge Rangers crossed 4 red-backed salamanders, 7 spring peepers (+3 dead), 2 pickerel frogs, 2 green frogs, and 2 American toads, and counted 1 dead newt, in one evening on the road. Total: 17 live + 4 dead.

Springfield, VT

Route 5. In a mere two nights, a family of five busily worked to cross an impressive 65 spotted salamanders, 57 wood frogs, 167 spring peepers, 19 American toads, and 9 gray tree frogs. Total: 317 live.

Swanzey

A boy wearing a reflective vest and headlamp holds a spotted salamander. (photo © Karrie Kalich)

Grady proclaimed that his first Big Night experience was “the best night ever!” We’re inclined to agree. (photo © Karrie Kalich)

Matthews Road. In only 4 volunteer-hours spread over three site visits, the Matthews Road crew crossed 17 spotted salamanders (+7 dead), 5 wood frogs (+5 dead), 60 spring peepers (+43 dead), 1 pickerel frog, and 10 American toads (+8 dead). Total: 93 live + 63 dead. This site needs more help in 2020!

Sawyers Crossing Road. A solo salamander superhero moved 4 spotted salamanders to safety while coming and going at Sawyers Crossing. Total: 4 live.

Swanzey Lake Road. Logging 22 volunteer-hours over five nights, the dedicated critter rescuers of Swanzey Lake Road moved 54 spotted salamanders (+5 dead), 1 Jefferson complex salamander, 10 newts (+4 dead), 28 four-toed salamanders (+3 dead), 12 red-backed salamanders (+2 dead), 1 wood frog, 119 spring peepers (+26 dead), and 1 American toad to safety. Total: 226 live + 40 dead.

Westmoreland

Glebe Road. A hoppin’ site! The Glebe Road crew crossed an impressive 112 spotted salamanders (+6 dead), 4 Jefferson complex salamanders, 12 newts (+10 dead), 4 four-toed salamanders, 5 wood frogs, 432 spring peepers (+48 dead), 10 pickerel frogs, 4 green frogs, 3 bullfrogs, and a whopping 35 American toads. They also found 6 dead amphibians that they couldn’t identify. Total: 621 live + 70 dead.

A wood frog with bits of leaves stuck to its skin. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

On the first Big Night of 2019, the rain didn’t arrive until late, but wood frogs migrated by the hundreds in a light mist. Without rain to wash them clean, many of the frogs carried bits of the forest floor — from which they’d only just emerged — with them on the journey to their breeding pools. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

River Road. Over the course of four nights, the small, but fierce River Road crew crossed a whopping 190 spotted salamanders (+1 dead), 13 Jefferson complex salamanders, 5 newts, 2 four-toed salamanders, 2 red-backed salamanders, 97 wood frogs (+2 dead), 5 spring peepers, 1 pickerel frog, and 5 American toads. 112 of those spotties were crossed on a single night in April! Total: 320 live + 3 dead.

Stonewall Circle. One volunteer scooted 7 American toads off this residential road near the Glebe Road crossing while on an early-morning walk! Total: 7 live.

Winchester

Forest Lake Road. In two where-did-all-the-rain-go nights near the beginning of the migration season, the Picadilly Farm crew crossed 9 live amphibians, including 5 four-toed salamanders, 3 wood frogs, and 1 lucky spring peeper. They also counted 3 dead newts. Total: 9 live + 3 dead.

Three cheers for the Salamander Crossing Brigades! We can’t wait to do it all over again in 2020.

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May 3, 2019

Homeward Bound

A gray tree frog is well camouflaged against the road pavement. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

A well-camouflaged gray tree frog pauses on North Lincoln Street on May 3. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

If it’s Friday, it must be raining! Last Friday’s cold rain made us wonder if the lull in amphibian activity was due more to the chill than to it being the end of salamander season, so a handful of hearty Salamander Brigadiers went out in this Friday night’s (considerably warmer) rain to see what they could see. Collectively, they crossed 401 critters, bringing our season total to 4,634 live amphibians. Across the board, spotted salamanders were headed back to their woodland burrows, their courtship done for the year. Spring peepers, on the other hand, were still wetland-bound. Read on for site-by-site details…

Hancock

Route 123. One volunteer kindly crossed 1 spotted salamander (+3 dead) on her way home.

Harrisville

Two hands hold a redbacked salamander. (photo © Evan Meeker)

It’s no easy feat to pick up a redbacked salamander from a wet road! They’re squirmy. (photo © Evan Meeker)

Breed Road. One her way home from another site, a tired Crossing Brigadier moved 8 spotted salamanders (+1 dead) — including two juveniles the size of her pinky finger! — and 2 American toads (+2 dead) to safety, 10 critters in all. She also noted that many red-backed salamanders, spring peepers, and young bullfrogs were out and about!

Chesham Road. That same solo Brigadier helped 2 spotted salamanders across Chesham Road on her way home. Sadly, she also counted 3 dead spotties, and noted many other roadkilled amphibians between Route 101 and the intersection with Breed Road.

Nelson Road. Around midnight, 1 spotted salamander was ferried to safety between Childs Bog and Tolman Pond Road in Harrisville.

Keene

North Lincoln Street. Two volunteers crossed 14 spotted salamanders, 152 spring peepers (+12 dead), 1 American toad, and 2 gray tree frogs, for a total of 169 live amphibians in the span of three hours. All of the salamanders were leaving the wetland, while 85% of the spring peepers were surprisingly heading to the water.

Nelson

A hand holds a small spotted salamander. (photo © Sarah Murphy)

So. Stinking. Cute. (photo © Sarah Murphy)

Granite Lake Road. A terrific twosome crossed 1 spotted salamander (+1 dead), 1 newt (+2 dead), 1 four-toed salamander, 1 two-lined salamander (+2 dead), 2 red-backed salamanders, 29 spring peepers (+37 dead), 5 green frogs (+2 dead), 1 American toad (+1 dead), and two unidentified dead amphibians. In all, they helped 41 amphibians in just over an hour!

Peterborough

Summer Street. A dedicated duo crossed 11 spotted salamanders (+5 dead), 1 wood frog, 45 spring peepers (+14 dead), 4 green frogs (+2 dead), 2 bullfrogs, 4 American toads (+1 dead), and noted 2 dead newts, for a total of 67 live amphibians.

Swanzey

Swanzey Lake Road. A solo salamander saver crossed 4 spotted salamanders and 16 spring peepers (+11 dead) in two hours at Swanzey Lake Road, 20 live amphibians in all.

Westmoreland

Glebe Road. A solo salamander superhero crossed 1 spotted salamander, 3 newts (+1 dead), 4 four-toed salamanders, 89 spring peepers (+11 dead), and 3 American toads, 100 live amphibians in all.

Do you have amphibian tallies or photos to share from May 3? We’ll update this report and the Salamander Crossing Brigade album on Flickr as we receive counts and photos, so send ’em on in!

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April 26, 2019

Another Little Night

A man smiles at a bullfrog, which he's holding in his hand. (photo © Alison Anderson)

In addition to the Monadnock Region crossings, we also heard from a family of Crossing Brigadiers in Newmarket, who moved 32 amphibians of 8 different species (including this dapper bullfrog) to safety  on April 22 and 26, and watched as a porcupine safely crossed itself. (photo © Alison Anderson)

If it’s Friday, it must be raining! Friday’s rain was on the cold side, though, and salamander season is on the wane, so amphibian movement was decidedly quieter than the past two Fridays. Still, a score of Crossing Brigadiers braved the rain and moved nearly 70 critters safety, bringing our season total to 4,219 crossed critters. Here are the site-specific counts:

Keene

Jordan Road. In two hours, the Crossing Brigadiers at Jordan Road found only 1 dead spring peeper!

North Lincoln Street. The City of Keene closed the North Lincoln Street crossing site to traffic once again, and 14 people came out in search of critters. Collectively, they crossed 1 spotted salamander, 32 spring peepers, and 4 earthworms. While no one could ascertain the earthworms’ direction of travel, all 33 amphibians were observed leaving the wetland.

Peterborough

Summer Street. Four valiant volunteers crossed 25 spotted salamanders (+2 dead), 1 red-backed salamander, and 10 spring peepers (+3 dead), 36 critters in total. All of the spotties were headed back to the woods, their egg laying and courtship over for the year.

Do you have amphibian tallies or photos to share from April 26? We’ll update this report and the Salamander Crossing Brigade album on Flickr as we receive counts and photos, so send ’em on in!

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April 23, 2019

A Small, Late Night

Rain didn’t arrive until after 10 p.m. on Tuesday night, but a few brave Brigadiers headed out for late-night critter crossing:

Keene

Two hands holding a spotted salamander. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

Helping hands. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

Jordan Road. A quick walk up and down the road revealed 1 spring peeper and 1 dead red-backed salamander.

North Lincoln Street. After midnight, a dynamic duo moved 2 spotted salamanders back to the woods and crossed 5 spring peepers (+1 dead), for a total of 7 live amphibians.

Peterborough

Summer Street. Two dedicated volunteers spent three hours out in the rain and moved 2 spotted salamanders, 1 newt (+1 dead), 1 wood frog (+1 dead), 35 spring peepers (+7 dead), and 1 American toad, 40 live amphibians in all.

Do you have amphibian tallies or photos to share from April 23? We’ll update this report and the Salamander Crossing Brigade album on Flickr as we receive counts and photos, so send ’em on in!

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April 22, 2019

Big Night on Earth Day

Six people wearing reflective vests and carrying flashlights stand next to a sign that says, "Caution Salamander Crossing." (photo © Sarah Murphy)

MANY THANKS to the Peterborough Conservation Commission for purchasing these signs for our Summer Street amphibian crossing, and to the Summer Street Crossing Brigade crew, who moved 190 amphibians to safety on Earth Day! (photo © Sarah Murphy)

Finally, rain arrived while we were all awake to enjoy it! Crossing Brigadiers moved more than 1,500 amphibians to safety on Monday night, bringing our season total to 4,063 crossed critters. At a number of sites, the majority of amphibians were heading away from their breeding pools, their courtship and egg laying done for the year, a sign that salamander season may be nearing its end.

Read on for site-by-site totals, listed alphabetically by town:

Deering

Route 149. A fantastic foursome crossed 22 spotted salamanders (+13 dead), 4 red-backed salamanders, 1 newt, 37 spring peepers (+20 dead), 2 green frogs, and 1 bullfrog for a total of 67 live amphibians.

Dunbarton

Robert Rogers Road. A solo Brigadier moved 7 spring peepers (+4 dead), 1 wood frog, and 2 green frogs to safety, 10 live amphibians in all. She also crossed 1 fortunate earthworm and 1 beetle!

Hancock

Antrim Road. Patrolling a half-mile stretch of road, a lovely family of nature lovers moved 1 spotted salamander, 3 red-backed salamanders, 1 two-lined salamander, 2 newts, 10 spring peepers (+3 dead), 3 green frogs, and 1 pickerel frog to safety, for a total of 21 live amphibians.

Harrisville

Two hands holding a spotted salamander. (photo © Janessa Palmer)

A Crossing Brigadier lends a spotted salamander a helping hand on Earth Day 2019. (photo © Janessa Palmer)

Breed Road. A family of Brigadiers spent an hour scouting out three separate locations on Breed Road — one near Cottage Lane, one near Silver Lake, and one near Childs Bog. From their report, the Cottage Lane and Childs Bog areas seem most promising for future crossing endeavors. Collectively, at all three sites, they moved 1 newt (+6 dead), 3 red-backed salamanders, 1 four-toed salamander, 3 spring peepers, and 9 American toads (+1 dead) — 17 live amphibians in all. They also observed 4 dead amphibians of unknown species.

Chesham & Nelson Roads. On her way home from another site, a solo Brigadier stopped to escort 8 amphibians across Chesham and Nelson Road: 3 spotted salamanders (+3 dead), 1 Jefferson complex salamander (a new species record for Harrisville!), and 3 American toads (+2 dead).

Keene

Eastern Avenue. Checking on the frogs of Eastern Avenue after her work at Jordan Road was done, our longtime Jordan Road site coordinator moved 4 wood frogs to safety, and noted 4 dead.

Jordan Road. A record 13 volunteers turned out at Jordan Road for Earth Day! Together, they crossed 2 spotted salamanders (+1 dead), 11 red-backed salamanders, 2 newts (+2 dead), 1 wood frog (+1 dead), 2 spring peepers, 1 pickerel frog, 3 American toads, and 3 gray tree frogs, totaling 25 live amphibians of 8 different species.

A boy cradles a wood frog in his hands. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

The wood frogs of North Lincoln Street were very patient with the paparazzi. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

North Lincoln Street. The North Lincoln Street crossing site was once again closed to traffic, to protect migrating amphibians and the people who love them. (WMUR even took note of the closure!) Approximately 35 people, including at least 8 families and one gentleman who works for the City of Keene, came out in the rain. Collectively, they carefully counted 13 spotted salamanders, 4 red-backed salamanders, 26 wood frogs, 156 spring peepers, 12 American toads, and 3 gray tree frogs, 214 amphibians in all. Sadly, they also noted 1 dead red-backed salamander, 2 dead newts, 1 dead wood frog, 14 dead spring peepers, and 1 dead American toad, likely roadkilled the previous night or early morning, when the road was open to vehicles. Nearly all of the wood frogs, many of the spotted salamanders, and half of the peepers were headed back to the woods, their breeding done for the year.

Nelson

A man in a reflective vest smiles while holding a spotted salamander. (photo © Janessa Palmer)

We’ve said it before, and we’ll say it again: salamanders make people smile.
(photo © Janessa Palmer)

Granite Lake Road. Scouting a new site in front of the Nelson School, a dynamic duo crossed 20 spotted salamanders (+7 dead), 5 two-lined salamanders, 1 red-backed salamander, 2 wood frogs, 75 spring peepers (+12 dead), 15 green frogs (+2 dead), 6 American toads, and 2 dead newts, for an impressive total of 124 live amphibians. Now that it’s been discovered, this site should definitely be on Nelson’s radar for future migration nights!

Nelson Road. Barred owls caterwauled and a mouse scuttled across the road while three veteran volunteers trained three new volunteers (a 1:1 student-teacher ratio!) Together, the group crossed 7 spotted salamanders, 8 wood frogs (+1 dead), 112 spring peepers (+29 dead), and 2 American toads, and counted 8 dead newts, bringing the total for the night to 129 live amphibians.

Peterborough

A girl wearing a reflective vest holds a spotted salamander. (photo © Sara Brazer)

Little hands, big salamander.
(photo © Sara Brazer)

Summer Street. An impressive crew of 15 volunteers crossed 56 spotted salamanders (+2 dead), 1 newt, 20 wood frogs (+ 3 dead), 101 spring peepers (+33 dead), 5 green frogs (+2 dead), 1 bullfrog, 5 American toads (+2 dead), and 1 gray tree frog at Summer Street, 190 live critters in all. Many thanks, again, to the Peterborough Conservation Commission for purchasing fantastic, new, highly visible “salamander crossing” signs for this site!

Richmond

Fish Hatchery Road. A solo Brigadier moved 1 spotted salamander (+1 dead), 1 red-backed salamander, 1 spring peeper, and 1 gray tree frog, safely crossing a total of 4 amphibians.

Rindge

Old Ashburnham Road. While lots of frogs were serenading from the pond, it was a quiet night on the road. Undettered, a dynamic duo in Rindge crossed 5 spring peepers, 1 green frog, and 1 American toad, for a total 7 amphibians.

Springfield, VT

Route 5. A family of five worked busily over an hour and a half to move 53 spotted salamanders, 7 wood frogs, 52 spring peepers, 19 American toads, and 9 gray tree frogs, 140 animals in all!

Swanzey

An American toad stands tall. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

The Maestro. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

Matthews Road. A solo salamander shepherd moved 5 spotted salamanders (+1 dead), 2 wood frogs (+5 dead), 27 spring peepers (+23 dead), 1 pickerel frog, and 10 American toads (+4 dead) to safety at Matthews Roadd, for a total of 45 live amphibians.

Swanzey Lake Road. A terrific trio moved 9 spotted salamanders (+1 dead), 28 four-toed salamanders (!!!)(+3 dead), 6 red-backed salamanders, 22 spring peepers (+12 dead), and 1 American toad to safety, and counted 4 dead newts, 66 live amphibians in all.

Westmoreland

Glebe Road. Serenaded by the roar of peepers and the trill of toads, 8 Crossing Brigadiers moved an impressive 92 spotted salamanders (+3 dead), 2 wood frogs, 120 spring peepers (+18 dead), 6 pickerel frogs, 4 green frogs, 2 bullfrogs, and 30 American toads to safety, and counted 5 dead newts. In total, 256 animals were crossed in less than three hours! The majority of them were leaving the pond for the year.

River Road. Thoroughly soaked in a deluge of hard rain, a mother-son team of salamander superheroes crossed a remarkable 112 spotted salamanders, 2 Jefferson salamanders, 1 newt, 2 red-backed salamanders, 53 wood frogs, 2 spring peepers, 1 pickerel frog, and 4 American toads — 177 critters in less than two hours!

Do you have amphibian tallies or photos to share from April 22? We’ll update this report and the Salamander Crossing Brigade album on Flickr as we receive counts and photos, so send ’em on in!

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April 20, 2019

The Migration Continues…

A person in raingear and a reflect vest holds a spotted salamander cupped in two hands. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

Who can resist a face like that?
(photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

In what has become a definitive trend of 2019, showers originally predicted for early in the evening on April 20 did not materialize until the wee hours. Some amphibians moved in the muggy air anyway, and a few dedicated Crossing Brigadiers were there to shepherd them on their way, bringing our season total for crossed critters to 2,543 live amphibians. Here’s the detailed report from Saturday night:

Peterborough

Summer Street. Three separate groups of Brigadiers — one early evening, one late-night, and one early morning on Sunday — collectively crossed 8 spotted salamanders (+ 2 dead), 2 newts (+ 1 dead), 7 wood frogs (+ 6 dead), 64 spring peepers (+ 27 dead), 3 American toads (+ 1 dead), 5 green frogs (+ 2 dead), 1 bullfrog, and 1 pickerel frog (+ 20 dead), 91 live amphibians in all. Sadly, they also noted 1 dead baby turtle.

Rindge

Old New Ipswich & Perry Roads. The Rindge Rangers crossed 4 red-backed salamanders, 7 spring peepers (+ 3 dead), 2 green frogs, 2 pickerel frogs, 2 American toads, and 1 snail, and found 1 dead newt, 17 live amphibians in all.

Do you have amphibian tallies or photos to share from April 20? We’ll update this report and the Salamander Crossing Brigade album on Flickr as we receive counts and photos, so send ’em on in!

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April 19, 2019

Small Night Early, Big Night Late

A gray tree frog hunkers down while crossing a paved road. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

Gray tree frogs made their first appearance of the season on April 19! (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

Once again, rain predicted to arrive before nightfall didn’t show up until midnight. However, some frogs and toads took advantage of the balmy humidity to make their move even before the rains came, and when the rain finally did arrive, amphibians were out in force. Our totals don’t reflect the “bigness” of the night because most of our Brigadiers were aslumber by the time salamanders were afoot, but a few late-night (human) travelers saw the massive migration. Here are the counts we’ve got from Friday:

Harrisville

Nelson Road. On her way home from Keene, a weary Brigadier crossed 5 spotted salamanders — and noted scores of peepers, bullfrogs, wood frogs, and toads — in late-night rain on Nelson Road in Harrisville.

Keene

Jordan Road. Two groups of Brigadiers spent a short time at Jordan Road, collectively crossing 1 spotted salamander, 1 Jefferson complex salamander, 1 redbacked salamander, and 1 American toad, and noted 2 dead spring peepers, 4 live amphibians in all.

A toad pauses in a road. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

Madame Toad commands instant respect.
(photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

North Lincoln Street. The City of Keene once again closed this crossing site to traffic to protect migrating amphibians and the families who come out to see them. As seems to be par for the course this season, people came out early and the rain was late! Thankfully, the muggy air still spurred many frogs to action in the early part of the evening. Between sunset and 11:45 p.m., 40+ human visitors to the site counted 50 wood frogs, 95 spring peepers, 22 American toads, 1 gray tree frog (a first for the season!), and 2 spotted salamanders, for a total of 170 amphibians. Of note: all the wood frogs on the road were leaving the wetland, their courtship and egg laying done for the year. There were still plenty of wood frogs chorusing in the water, though. Their serenade was accompanied by spring peepers in full chorus and the very first toad trills of the season.

Nelson

Nelson Road. On her way home from Keene, a weary Brigadier crossed 9 spotted salamanders and 2 bullfrogs — and played an intense game of Frogger with hundreds of spring peepers, bullfrogs, wood frogs, and other amphibians who were out and about in after-midnight rains — along Nelson Road in Nelson.

Richmond

Fish Hatchery Road. A solo Brigadier did a late-night run, crossing 2 red-backed salamanders, 2 wood frogs, and 7 spring peepers, 11 amphibians in all.

Do you have amphibian tallies or photos to share from April 19? We’ll update this report and the Salamander Crossing Brigade album on Flickr as we receive counts and photos, so send ’em on in!

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April 18, 2019

A Small Night

A wood frog pauses on the road, with a pine needle stuck to its face. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

A wood frog so fresh out of the woods that he’s brought some of the woods with him!
(photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

The faintest trickle of a migration happened in an evening mist on April 18. Very few critters were out and about. Some of the ones that were seen were heading away from their breeding wetlands — their courtship and egg laying done for the year — a sign that the tide of the migration may be turning. Still, a dozen Crossing Brigadiers moved nearly 100 amphibians to safety, which is certainly worth celebrating! Read on for site-by-site details.

Concord

Fisk Road. The Concord crew crossed 1 spotted salamander, 1 newt, 1 four-toed salamander, 2 wood frogs, and 4 spring peepers (+ 1 dead), for a total of 9 live amphibians. They also noted that the wood frogs seemed to be homeward bound, and that wood frogs were no longer chorusing in the nearby wetland, a sign that the migration may winding down at this site.

Dunbarton

Robert Rogers Road. A solo salamander saver crossed 2 four-toed salamanders (+ noted 1 dead), 2 wood frogs, and 7 spring peepers (+ 2 dead), and noted 4 dead unknown amphibians, 11 live amphibians in all.

Gilsum

Hammond Hollow Road. A salamander enthusiast counted 2 spotted salamanders on Hammond Hollow Road on her way from here to there.

Keene

A boy wearing a reflective vest and headlamp holds a spotted salamander. (photo © Karrie Kalich)

Grady proclaimed his first Crossing Brigade experience to be “the best night ever!!” We’re inclined to agree.
(photo © Karrie Kalich)

Eastern Avenue. Two Crossing Brigadiers patrolled Eastern Avenue, shepherding 3 spring peepers to safety and counting 23 dead.

Jordan Road. A trio of Crossing Brigadiers moved 1 Jefferson complex salamander and 1 red-backed salamander, and 1 spring peeperto safety at Jordan Road, 3 amphibians in all.

North Lincoln Street. A sole Salamander Brigadier crossed a sole peeper (+ noted 7 dead) at North Lincoln Street. She also enjoyed “lots of peeping and musical spring sounds.”

Nelson

Nelson Road. A dedicated Crossing Brigadier moved 1 newt (+ 2 dead), 8 wood frogs, and 40 spring peepers (+ 2 dead) to safety, for a total of 49 live amphibians in just over an hour.

New Boston

Old Coach Road. A mother-son team spent an hour on Old Coach Road, moving 1 spotted salamander and 1 wood frog to safety in the evening mist.

Peterborough

Summer Street. A solo salamander superhero crossed 1 spotted salamander and 5 spring peepers (+ 14 dead), and noted 1 dead wood frog — 6 live amphibians in all — in 45 minutes on Summer Street.

Westmoreland

Stonewall Circle. An early morning walker rescued 7 American toads on Stonewall Circle.

Do you have amphibian tallies or photos to share? We’ll update this report and the Salamander Crossing Brigade album on Flickr as we receive counts and photos, so send ’em on in!

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April 14, 2019

Big Night #2

Two hands holding a spotted salamander. (photo © Abigail Touchet)

A Crossing Brigade volunteer lends a helping hand to a spotted salamander in Keene on April 14.
(photo © Abigail Touchet)

Once again, the rain arrived much later than anticipated, but once it did, frogs and salamanders were on the move. Despite the late start, our Crossing Brigade volunteers ensured the safe passage of more than 1,000 amphibians on Sunday night, bringing our season total to 2,192! Read on for site-by-site tallies, as reported by our hearty crew of late-night (and a few early-morning) Crossing Brigadiers.

Concord

Fisk Road. On an early morning stroll, a solo Brigadier crossed 4 wood frogs and 1 spring peeper, for a total of 5 live amphibians. He also encountered an array of roadkill from the night before, including 1 spotted salamander, 1 newt, 6 wood frogs, 4 spring peepers, and 1 American toad.

Dunbarton

Robert Rogers Road. Scouting out a new site, a solo Salamander Brigadier shepherded 2 wood frogs and 6 spring peepers to safety, 8 amphibians in all.

Harrisville

Breed Road. A quartet of Crossing Brigadiers crossed 7 spotted salamanders, 2 newts, 1 two-lined salamander, 1 dusky salamander, 2 wood frogs (+ 2 dead), 13 spring peepers (+ 1 dead), 2 pickerel frogs, and 1 American toad in the vicinity of Childs Bog, 29 live amphibians in all.

Chesham Road. A different volunteer crossed 4 spotted salamanders and 1 wood frog on her way home from another site. Hooray for 5 alive!

Keene

A woman in a reflective vest and rain jacket smiles while holding a spotted salamander. (photo © Abigail Touchet)

Further proof (as if you needed any….) that salamanders make people smile.
(photo © Abigail Touchet)

Jordan Road. Late-night volunteers at Jordan Road ferried 11 spotted salamanders (+1 dead), 4 red-backed salamanders (+1 dead), 3 two-lined salamanders, and 3 spring peepers (+3 dead) to safety, 21 live amphibians in all. They also recorded 1 dead wood frog. Seeing two-lined salamanders is a first for this site!

North Lincoln Street. The City of Keene once again closed the road to traffic and, in a carbon copy of Friday night, volunteers came out early and the rain was late! Families with small children still found heaps of frogs to help before bedtime. Then, a late-night crew materialized out of the darkness to take over. All told, 14 spotted salamanders, 2 red-backed salamanders, 82 wood frogs (+5 dead), 243 spring peepers (+17 dead), 1 bullfrog, and 2 American toads were counted! One first-time volunteer remarked on the magic of the night, as 344 animals were ensured safe passage. Also of note: we saw our first trickle of wood frogs and peepers moving away from the wetland, their egg-laying done for the year. More will undoubtedly follow on our next rainy night.

Milford & Mont Vernon

Route 13. A dynamic duo brought their tally sheet to a new and surprisingly heavily trafficked site. Though they counted 60 dead animals, they were able to ensure that 3 wood frogs, 8 spring peepers, 8 pickerel frogs, 1 green frog, and 6 American toads made it across the road, 26 live amphibians in all.

Nelson

Nelson Road. Four different road angels were at work over the course of the night at Nelson Road. Collectively, they moved 65 live amphibians to safety, including 3 spotted salamanders, 4 wood frogs (+1 dead), 57 spring peepers (+4 dead), 1 green frog. Also, 1 American toad was found dead.

New Boston

Old Coach Road. A mother-son team found more amphibians in the vernal pools than on the roads, but they did manage to cross 2 spotted salamanders.

Newport

Oak Street. A longtime Brigadier crossed 2 spotted salamanders, 1 wood frog, and 22 spring peepers (+ 4 dead peepers), and noted 1 dead newt, 25 live amphibians in all.

Peterborough

Two flourescent orange road signs, one that says "Caution Salamander Crossing" and one that says "Slow Volunteers Ahead." (photo © Sarah Murphy)

MANY THANKS to the Peterborough Conservation Commission for purchasing these signs for our Summer Street amphibian crossing. Drivers slowed WAY down when approaching the crossing after seeing this signs. Fantastic! (photo © Sarah Murphy)

Summer Street. Five enthusiastic volunteers went out early, but when the rain didn’t materialize, they decided to throw in the towel. Bolstered by a power nap, one of them returned for a rainy, late-night critter crossing mission. She moved 16 spotted salamanders, 1 four-toed salamander, 9 wood frogs (+ 11 dead), at least 40 spring peepers (+ 11 dead), and 2 pickerel frogs, for a total of 68 live amphibians. Many thanks to the Peterborough Conservation Commission for purchasing several new, highly visible “Salamander Crossing” and “Volunteers Ahead” signs for this site! Drivers definitely took notice and slowed down as they entered the crossing.

Springfield, VT

Route 5. A family of longtime Crossing Brigadiers moved 12 spotted salamanders, 50 wood frogs, and 115 spring peepers across Route 5, just over the river from the Granite State, for a total of 177 amphibians.

Swanzey

Swanzey Lake Road. A solo Swanzey salamander superhero moved 6 spotted salamanders (+3 dead), 6 red-backed salamanders (+2 dead), and 11 spring peepers (+3 dead), for a total of 23 amphibians.

Westmoreland

A wood frog with bits of leaves stuck to its skin. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

Wood frogs migrated in just a light mist on April 12 and 14. They were coming straight out of the woods, and with no rain to wash them clean, many of them were still carrying bits of the woods with them! (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

Glebe Road. Eleven people joined forces to cross 16 spotted salamanders (+1 dead), 1 Jefferson salamander, 6 newts (+4 dead), 2 wood frogs, 211 spring peepers (+19 dead), and 2 American toads on Sunday night. In the pre-dawn hour on Monday morning, one of those volunteers returned, contributing 1 spotted salamander (+2 dead), 3 Jefferson salamanders, 3 newts, 11 spring peepers, 4 pickerel frogs, and 1 bullfrog to the count. In all, 261 amphibians were helped to safety. These counts aren’t a “Big” Night for this site, but the raucous chorusing from the wetland is a sure sign that many critters made it across unaided in the late-night hours on both April 12 and 14.

River Road. A quintet of Crossing Brigadiers moved 1 spotted salamander, 16 wood frogs, 1 newt, and 1 spring peeper across River Road, 19 amphibians in total.

Do you have amphibian tallies or photos to share? We’ll update this report and the Salamander Crossing Brigade album on Flickr as we receive counts and photos, so send ’em on in!

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April 12, 2019

Big Night, Late Night

The rain didn’t get going until 10:30 p.m. or later on Friday, but once it did, frogs and salamanders were on the move! Read on for site-by-site tallies (alphabetical by town), as reported by our hearty crew of night owls and early birds:

A person in a red raincoat holds a spotted salamander. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

A spotted salamander gets a helping hand during the first Big Night of the season in Keene.
(photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

Concord

Fisk Road. Technically speaking, these counts are from April 13 but really, it was the same rain! On Saturday morning, an early bird in Concord safely ferried 3 wood frogs, 1 spring peeper, 1 newt, and 1 green frog across the road, and recorded 4 roadkilled wood frogs.

Harrisville

Chesham Road. On her way home from another crossing site in the wee hours, one tired volunteer shepherded 4 spotted salamanders across Chesham Road.

Keene

Eastern Avenue. In the early part of the evening, a brave volunteer spent half an hour at the Eastern Avenue crossing site, moving 10 wood frogs and 1 peeper to safety. During that same time, she sadly witnessed 16 wood frogs and 2 peepers succumb to car tires. Around midnight, two valiant volunteers crossed an additional 9 wood frogs at this site — for a total of 19 live amphibians across both the early and late shifts — and noted many frogs who had been killed while attempting to cross this busy road.

Jordan Road. The dedicated crew at Jordan Road crossed 17 spotted salamanders, 17 Jefferson complex salamanders, 14 wood frogs, 3 spring peepers, 1 redbacked salamander, and 1 newt, 53 amphibians in all.

A person in raingear and wearing a headlamp stoops on a dark road to pick up a frog. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

A Crossing Brigade volunteer stoops to examine a spring peeper on North Lincoln Street in Keene on April 12. The barricades closing the road to traffic — ensuring safe passage for amphibians and amphibian lovers alike — are visible in the background. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

North Lincoln Street. The City of Keene graciously closed the North Lincoln Street crossing site to vehicles on Friday night, providing safe passage for the amphibians and creating a safe place for the next generation of herpetologists to get to know our local frogs and salamanders. Between sunset and 12:30 a.m., 43 volunteers counted 345 wood frogs, 288 spring peepers, and 12 spotted salamanders, for a total of 645 live amphibians. Many more surely migrated well into the night. Two dead spring peepers were also found beyond the road closure barriers.

Milford & Amherst

Route 13 and Baboosic Lake Road. An intrepid mother-daughter team on a late-night scouting mission may have discovered two new crossing sites, on Route 13 in Milford and Baboosic Lake Road in Amherst. Stay tuned for more details from future Big Nights!

New Boston

Old Coach Road. A solo salamander superhero went out after midnight, crossing at least 20 spotted salamanders. She also reported seeing hundreds of peepers!

Newport

Oak Street. A longtime Brigadier crossed 7 “very cold and slow-moving” spring peepers in 45 minutes at Oak Street.

Swanzey

Matthews Road. In one hour at Matthews Road, a solo salamander shepherd crossed 33 spring peepers (and, sadly, noted 20 dead), 12 spotted salamanders (+ 6 dead), and 3 wood frogs, and counted 4 dead American toads, for a total of 48 live amphibians.

Swanzey Lake Road. A terrific trio crossed 66 spring peepers (+ 1o dead), 48 spotted salamanders, 6 red-backed salamanders, 1 four-toed salamander, 1 dusky salamander, and 1 wood frog, 123 live amphibians in all.

Westmoreland

A Jefferson complex salamander pauses mid-migration on Jordan Road in Keene, NH. (photo © Anna Tomcyzk)

A Jefferson salamander pauses to contemplate the magic of Big Night. (photo © Anna Tomcyzk)

Glebe Road. A solo Crossing Brigadier crossed 2 spotted salamanders, 2 spring peepers, and 1 wood frog on a dry road (!) in the early part of the evening at Glebe Road.

River Road. A solo salamander superhero crossed 77 spotted salamanders (+ 1 dead), 9 Jefferson complex salamanders, 26 wood frogs (+ 2 dead), 5 newts, 2 spring peepers, and 1 American toad, for a total of 12o live amphibians, between 11 p.m. and 1 a.m.

Do you have amphibian tallies or photos to share? We’ll update this report and the Salamander Crossing Brigade album on Flickr as we receive counts and photos, so send ’em on in!

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March 31, 2019

The Faintest Trickle of a Migration

The spring migration got off to a very slow start on March 31, with just a handful of amphibians making their first appearances of the year on cold, wet roads in Keene and Westmoreland.

Keene

A cold wood frog pauses in the road. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

A chilly wood frog makes its way along North Lincoln Street during the first slow trickle of the 2019 amphibian migration. (photo © Brett Amy Thelen)

Eastern Avenue. A family of superheroes crossed 5 wood frogs (and counted 17 dead) in half an hour at Eastern Avenue.

Jordan Road. That same family also crossed the very first Jefferson salamander of the year at Jordan Road!

North Lincoln Street. Humans were more numerous than amphibians at North Lincoln Street, but 6 wood frogs and 3 spring peepers were given safe passage. 2 unfortunate roadkilled peepers and 2 unknown amphibian roadkills were also documented.

Westmoreland

River Road. A dynamic duo braved wind chills in the 30s for nearly an hour at River Road, crossing 2 wood frogs and 2 Jefferson salamanders — including one with a stumpy tail.

Winchester

Forest Lake Road. A trio of Crossing Brigadiers crossed a trio of wood frogs on a drying, cold road.

Do you have amphibian tallies or photos to share? We’ll update this report and the Salamander Crossing Brigade album on Flickr as we receive counts and photos, so send ’em on in!

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Contact Us

To volunteer or for more information, please contact Brett Amy Thelen at (603) 358-2065 or by email.