Salamander Forecast

When Will the Amphibians Migrate? Here's Our Best Guess.

Spring amphibian migrations are spurred by a combination of thawed ground, warm nighttime temperatures (above 40°F), and wet weather — though temperature fluctuations and varying snow depth mean that Big Night often occurs at different times in different places. Spring weather in New England is notoriously fickle, so check back often for the most up-to-date forecast!

May 10, 2022

The majority of the spring amphibian migration has come to an end. Stragglers will certainly migrate back to the woods from their breeding wetlands whenever it next rains at night, but concentrated “Big Nights” are likely over for the year. We won’t be updating the salamander forecast again until 2023.

That said, do stay alert, as frogs and toads will be out and about on rainy nights all summer longespecially on roads near wetlands, lakes, ponds, and other water bodies!

May 3, 2022

Last night saw steady rain and temperatures in the mid- to upper 40s — perfect conditions for a Big Night, had they taken place earlier in the season. Instead, there was but a slow trickle of movement. (We’ll post a full field report here when we’ve tallied all the counts from last night.) Based on this information, it seems unlikely that we’ll have another Big Night this spring, though some additional migration is certainly possible if it rains after dark in the next week or two. We’ll keep the forecast going just a little while longer, for those of you who still want to head out in search of peepers, toads, gray tree frogs, and other late-spring amphibians one last time…

May 2, 2022

At this late point in the season, it’s difficult to know how many amphibians have yet to migrate or which Big Night will be the last, but this may be the last week of concentrated migration for much of the Monadnock Region. Although there are several opportunities for nighttime rain in the forecast, tonight looks like the best chance for steady, early evening rain. If the rain comes as predicted, we will likely see a concentrated migration away from vernal pools for species whose courtship is over for the year — as well as the continued movement of American toads, gray tree frogs and other warm-weather species toward their breeding wetlands.

If it’s raining after dark and you’re up for one more amphibian adventure, grab your reflective vest and flashlight and head out to your nearest crossing! If you go, please remember to submit your counts and photos via the online forms on our Volunteer Materials page. We’re especially interested in hearing what percentage of amphibians were heading away from their breeding wetlands — as well as reports from people who went out in perfect conditions, but did not find amphibians — as this helps us gauge how close we are to the end of the migration season.

The North Lincoln Street crossing site in Keene will be closed to vehicles tonight, and Jordan Road in Keene will be closed to through-traffic as well. Critter counts and spot pattern photographs will continue at both sites − in part so we can report on how many amphibians benefited from the road closures. Although families and other community members are welcome to visit the North Lincoln Street crossing site, we ask that only trained Salamander Crossing Brigade volunteers in proper safety attire come to the Jordan Road crossing. You can find more information on the Keene amphibian detours here.

April 30, 2022

Showers are in the forecast for the first part of the week, but they may be scattered over the course of several nights. without one good soaker to concentrate all the activity on a single evening. Bottom line: if it’s wet after dark, amphibians will likely be afoot — but it may be more difficult than usual (ha!) to predict when and where the showers will appear, and amphibian movement could be localized. This could be the last week of migration season for the year, so keep your eyes to the skies, and stay tuned for updates!

April 27, 2022

Amphibians were on the move last night! Some spotties were going, some spotties were coming, and a diversity of warm-weather species (red-backed salamanders, American toads, gray tree frogs, green frogs, pickerel frogs, bullfrogs) stepped out in big numbers too. We’ll post a full field report here as soon as we’ve had a chance to tally all the counts.

The fact that some spotted salamanders were still heading to their breeding pools last night means that there’s still some migration yet to be had this spring — but how much, and when? At the moment, warm nighttime rain isn’t in the forecast again until next week. As we well know by now, that could change, so keep your eyes on the skies and stay tuned!

April 26, 2022

Migration is likely tonight! With an 80% chance of rain starting around sunset and temperatures in the low 50s, amphibians will likely be afoot. After this extended dry spell, we could see a concentrated migration away from the pools for species whose courtship is over for the year, as well as the first large-scale appearances of American toads and gray tree frogs, who typically need warmer temperatures for their springtime adventures.

If it’s raining after dark where you are, grab your reflective vest and flashlight, and head on out to your nearest crossing. If you go, don’t forget to submit your counts and photos via the online forms on our Volunteer Materials page. Remember, too, to move amphibians in whatever direction they’re heading: some will be leaving their breeding wetlands (wood frogs, Jefferson salamanders, some spring peepers and spotted salamanders) tonight, and others just arriving (American toads, gray tree frogs, some peepers and spotted salamanders). We’re especially interested in hearing what percentage of amphibians were heading away from their wetlands, as this helps us gauge how close we are to the end of the migration season.

The North Lincoln Street crossing site in Keene will be closed to vehicles tonight, and Jordan Road in Keene will be closed to through-traffic as well. Critter counts and spot pattern photographs will continue at both sites − in part so we can report on how many amphibians benefited from the road closures. Although families and other community members are welcome to visit the North Lincoln Street crossing site, we ask that only trained Salamander Crossing Brigade volunteers in proper safety attire come to the Jordan Road crossing. You can find more information on the Keene amphibian detours here.

April 23, 2022

Showers have popped up in the forecast for late afternoon into early evening, but are currently expected to end before sunset. Some amphibians could make their move on roads still wet from afternoon rain, but unless the rain lingers longer than predicted, any amphibian activity is likely to be short-lived.

If the ground is wet after dark where you are and you’re eager to see a few amphibians, grab your reflective vest and flashlight, and head on out to your nearest crossing. If you do go out, we’d love to hear what you find — even if it’s nothing. You can submit your counts and photos here.

Tuesday is our next chance of warm evening rain, but it’s too soon to say for sure. Stay tuned!

April 19, 2022

At the moment, the next chance of nighttime rain isn’t until next week, but we all know spring weather forecasts are not to be trusted that far in advance. While we wait and watch the weather, it’s worth noting that most of the wood frogs, half of the peepers, and even some of the spotted salamanders seen in last week’s migrations were leaving their breeding wetlands — a sign that migration may be starting to wind down at some sites.

After this extended dry spell, any warm rain after dark could spur a concentrated migration away from the pools for species whose courtship is over for the year — as well as the first appearances of American toads and gray tree frogs, who typically need warmer temperatures for their springtime adventures.

April 17, 2022

Once again, the weather threw us a curveball last night, with temperatures far colder than what was predicted! Some amphibians made their move, but it was too chilly for a truly Big Night. (We’ll post a full report here once all the counts have come in.) At some sites, the majority of amphibians were heading away from their wetlands, a sign that migration season may be winding down — but there will likely still be another few migration nights to come before all is said and done.

Looking ahead, conditions are predicted to either be too cold or too dry for amphibian migration in the coming week — but, as we know by now, that could well change. Stay tuned!

April 16, 2022

Migration is likely tonight! Right now, rain seems certain from afternoon into evening. The only question is whether temperatures in the low to mid-40s might feel chilly to our ectothermic friends now that we’ve had several weeks of warmer weather. It’s possible that we’ll see a short burst of intense amphibian activity just after nightfall, with movement slowing later in the evening as the mercury dips.

If it’s raining and above 40° after dark where you are, grab your reflective vest and flashlight, and head on out to your nearest crossing. If you go, don’t forget to submit your counts and photos via the online forms on our Volunteer Materials page. Amphibians could be moving in both directions tonight — some leaving their breeding wetlands, their courtship and egg laying done for the year, with others still heading into the pools. Remember to always move amphibians in whatever direction they’re heading. They know where they want to go!

The North Lincoln Street crossing site in Keene will be closed to vehicles tonight, and Jordan Road in Keene will be closed to through-traffic as well. Critter counts and spot pattern photographs will continue at both sites − in part so we can report on how many amphibians benefited from the road closures. Although families and other community members are welcome to visit the North Lincoln Street crossing site, we ask that only trained Salamander Crossing Brigade volunteers in proper safety attire come to the Jordan Road crossing. You can find more information on the Keene amphibian detours here.

April 15, 2022

Yesterday was an exercise in the futility of weather forecasts! Solid evening rain had been predicted for days, but in the end, there was only a passing sprinkle. Some amphibians did make their move on wet roads, guided by our Brigadiers — we’ll post a report here as soon as all the tallies come in — but it was by no means a Big Night. Now, we turn our attention to Saturday, which is expected to be an all-day soaker. The question is: will the rain continue after dark and, if it does, will temperatures stay high enough for long enough to trigger a significant migration? We usually say that 40° is the cutoff point, but mid-40s would be far better. Stay tuned!

April 14, 2022

What looked like a for-sure Big Night is now a bit of a nail-biter. Current forecasts are projecting a 60% chance of rain at last light, dropping to 40% shortly afterward and ending completely by 11 p.m. After a week of warming temperatures, and with nighttime temps in the 50s, any rain after dark is likely to spur a migration — but if the wet weather moves out quickly, amphibian movement could be short-lived. The timing and duration of the rain will be key, so paying attention to your local conditions will be especially important tonight. Similar conditions are on tap for Saturday night.

If it’s wet after dark where you are, grab your reflective vest and flashlight, and head on out to your nearest crossing. If you go, don’t forget to submit your counts and photos via the online forms on our Volunteer Materials page. Amphibian egg masses have started to appear in vernal pools throughout the region, so amphibians could be moving in both directions tonight — some leaving their breeding wetlands, their courtship and egg laying done for the year, with others still heading into the pools. Remember to always move amphibians in whatever direction they’re heading. They know where they want to go!

Note: Due to the short window of time that rain is predicted for this eventing, the North Lincoln Street and Jordan Road crossing sites in Keene will not be closed to vehicles tonight, so if you venture out to those sites, reflective vests, bright lights, and staying alert to traffic are absolute musts.

April 13, 2022

With this week’s warm temperatures, any rain after dark is likely to spur amphibians to action. Tonight has strong potential for nighttime showers, but not until after 11 p.m. — a boon for the salamanders and frogs, who will have fewer cars to contend with, but less exciting for us humans. Our next chance for warm rain in the waking hours is tomorrow. If that rain arrives as forecast, we could be in for a Big Night, but it’s too soon to say for sure.

If you’re still awake when tonight’s rain moves through and you’re up for the adventure, grab your reflective vest and flashlight and head out to your nearest crossing! Please remember to submit your counts and photos via the online forms here.

If you’re night that much of a night owl, sit tight. Tomorrow and Saturday both hold promise for continued migration. Stay tuned!

April 11, 2022

With this week’s warm temperatures, any rain after dark is likely to spur amphibians to action. Tonight and Wednesday both have strong potential for nighttime showers, but not until after midnight — a boon for the salamanders and frogs, who will have fewer cars to contend with, but less exciting for us humans. Our next chance for warm rain in the waking hours is Thursday. If that rain arrives as forecast, we could be in for a Big Night, but it’s too soon to say for sure. Stay tuned!

April 9, 2022

We marked tonight as yellow instead of red because some forecasts show today’s rain ending around 6 or 7 p.m. We wouldn’t expect a Big Night without active precipitation, but some amphibians could make their move on wet roads shortly after nightfall. If the showers end by mid-afternoon and the ground has time to dry before dark, a migration is unlikely.

Looking ahead, both Monday and Wednesday have strong potential for nighttime rain, but not until after midnight — a boon for the salamanders and frogs, who will have fewer cars to contend with, but less exciting for us humans. Our next chance for warm rain in the waking hours is Thursday, but it’s far too soon to say for sure. Stay tuned!

April 8, 2022

Amphibians were afoot in some places last night, albeit in much smaller numbers than March 31, due to the chilly temperatures. We’ll post a field report here as soon as all the tallies trickle in.

Looking ahead: Saturday’s warm rain is currently expected to end before nightfall. If that timing shifts and it ends up raining after dark, amphibians could be afoot that night. There’s also a chance of rain starting at 2 a.m. Monday night into Tuesday morning — too late for most Brigadiers, but perhaps not for a few intrepid night owls out there!

After that, we’ll be waiting and watching the weather for the next good chance of warm evening rain. Stay tuned!

April 7, 2022

We don’t have the option of making the color-coded forecast half-green and half-yellow, but if we did, that’s how we’d mark tonight! Rain seems certain after 8 or 9 p.m., but temperatures might be on the chilly side for amphibians. In places where the mercury dips below 40° by the time the rain rolls in, migration could be minimal. If and where the temperature hovers above 40°, amphibians will likely be afoot. It’s possible that some parts of the Monadnock Region will experience a migration, while others will be too cold — or that there could be a burst of activity that slows as the temperature drops. In other words: migration is possible, but not a sure thing, and it could vary site by site. Paying attention to your local conditions will be especially important tonight.

If it’s raining and in the 40s after dark tonight where you are, don your reflective vest and flashlight, and head to your nearest crossing! If it’s dry or below 40°, sit tight and wait for another night. If you do go out, don’t forget to submit your counts and photos via the online forms on our Volunteer Materials page.

The North Lincoln Street crossing site in Keene will be closed to vehicles tonight, and Jordan Road in Keene will be closed to through-traffic as well. Critter counts and spot pattern photographs will continue at both sites − in part so we can report on how many amphibians benefited from the road closures. Although families and other community members are welcome to visit the North Lincoln Street crossing site, we ask that only trained Salamander Crossing Brigade volunteers in proper safety attire come to the Jordan Road crossing. You can find more information on the Keene amphibian detours here.

April 6, 2022

We are still keeping our eye on Thursday. Rain seems certain that night, but temperatures will be on the chilly side for amphibians. In places where the temperature dips below 40° shortly after sunset, migration could be minimal. If and where the mercury hovers above 40°, amphibians will likely be afoot. It’s possible that some parts of the Monadnock Region will experience a migration, while others will be too cold — or that there could be a burst of activity shortly after sunset that slows as the temperature drops. In other words: migration is possible, but not a sure thing, and it could vary site by site.

April 4, 2022

Last night ended up being too chilly for any significant amphibian movement, but warm rain is in the forecast this week! Thursday looks particularly promising, but it’s too soon to say for sure. Stay tuned!

April 3, 2022

There’s a 40-50% chance of showers tonight, but temperatures are right on the edge of frog-friendliness. If the rain materializes, it could spur some amphibians to action in places where the temperature lingers above 40°, but any activity is likely to be short-lived: once the mercury drops, amphibians will likely hunker down.

If it’s raining and in the 40s after dark tonight where you are, don your reflective vest and flashlight, and head to your nearest crossing! If you do, we’d love to know what you find.

If it’s too cold, too dry, or you’re still resting up after Thursday’s Big Night, never fear! We’ve got a wet week ahead, with the potential for a migration on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday nights. Thursday looks particularly promising at the moment.

April 2, 2022

Thursday was a Very Big Night, especially for wood frogs and peepers! It’ll take us a while to sort through all the counts and photos, but once we do, we’ll post a field report here.

The week ahead looks wet indeed, but timing and temperature will be key, as always. Sunday night currently has a 50% chance of showers around and shortly after sunset. In many towns, it’ll be too cold for significant amphibian movement, but if the rain arrives as predicated and temperatures linger above 40°, any frogs who didn’t make their move on March 31 could be spurred to action — at least until the chill sets in around 9 or 10 p.m.

After that, we’re keeping close watch on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday nights, all of which might bring rain. At the moment, Tuesday’s rain isn’t expected to arrive until well after midnight and Wednesday’s rain may end before nightfall, but that timing could change five times over in the next few days. Stay tuned!

March 31, 2022

With a 90% chance of rain and temperatures in the 50s, tonight could be our first Big Night of the season! If it’s raining after dark where you are, grab your reflective vest and flashlight, and head on out to your nearest crossing. If you go, don’t forget to submit your counts and photos via the online forms on our Volunteer Materials page. As a reminder, although we accept crossing data from throughout New Hampshire, we’ll only be sharing data from the greater Monadnock Region in our field reports. If you live outside the Monadnock Region, it may make more sense to submit your counts to a different program; you can learn more about that here.

The North Lincoln Street crossing site in Keene will be closed to vehicles tonight, and Jordan Road in Keene will be closed to through-traffic as well. Critter counts and spot pattern photographs will continue at both sites − in part so we can report on how many amphibians benefited from the road closures. Although families and other community members are welcome to visit the North Lincoln Street crossing site, we ask that only trained Salamander Crossing Brigade volunteers in proper safety attire come to the Jordan Road crossing. You can find more information on the Keene amphibian detours here.

March 27, 2022

The rain never materialized last night, so we’re still waiting for that first Big Night. Thursday looks quite promising, but it’s too soon to say for sure. Stay tuned!

March 26, 2022

Tonight’s a nail-biter! Rain has been weaving in and out of the forecast. As of this writing at 10 a.m., there is a 50% chance of showers at sundown, dropping to 30% by 8 p.m. in Keene and 9 p.m. in Peterborough. If wet weather lingers after sunset, amphibians will likely be afoot, at least for a few hours — but if the showers come through earlier than expected (and the ground is dry by nightfall), or later than expected (when temperatures will drop into the 30s), amphibian activity might be minimal. It’s possible we won’t know what the weather will bring until just before nightfall.

If it’s still raining and in the 40s after dark tonight, don your reflective vest and flashlight, and head to your nearest crossing! If you do, we’d love to know what you find.

If it’s dry, sit tight and keep your eye on Thursday, which looks like our next chance for steady nighttime rain.

March 24, 2022

Rain seems certain tonight, but most forecasts for the Monadnock Region have temperatures dipping into the high 30s by 8 p.m. or earlier. While some cold-hardy wood frogs and spring peepers might make their move in 39° rain, a Big Night is unlikely. That could all change if the mercury tips a few degrees in the other direction — a distinct possibility given the fickle nature of spring weather in New England — so keep your eye on the temperature this evening!

After that, we’re looking to Saturday, when there’s a 40% chance of evening showers. Temperatures will be right on the cusp of frog-friendliness that night and the showers may be short-lived, so any amphibian movement could be short-lived too. As with tonight, a few degrees in either direction could make a big difference.

March 22, 2022

Thursday looks like our next chance for a reliable nighttime soaking, but most forecasts for the Monadnock Region have temperatures dipping into the high 30s by 8 p.m. (or earlier) that night. While some cold-hardy wood frogs and spring peepers might make their move in 39° rains, a Big Night is unlikely. That could all change if the mercury tips a few degrees in the other direction — a distinct possibility given the fickle nature of spring weather in New England — so keep your eye on the forecast for any changes!

After that, we’re looking to Saturday, when there’s a 30-50% chance of evening showers. Temperatures will be right on the cusp of frog-friendliness that night too, so any amphibian movement could be short-lived. As with Thursday, a few degrees in either direction could make a big difference.

March 20, 2022

UPDATE at 8:15 p.m.: SURPRISE RAIN! These showers were not in the forecast until an hour or so ago — and it may be too chilly, and the rain too light, for much amphibian movement — but if temperatures are in the 40s and raindrops are falling where you are, grab a reflective vest and flashlight and head out to your nearest crossing see if frogs are afoot! If you do go, let us know what you find by submitting your counts via the online forms here.

Last night was not the Big Night we’d anticipated. The forecast of solid all-day-into-night rain dissipated, and we were left with a dry evening followed by a wicked thunderstorm that sent Crossing Brigadiers scurrying for shelter around 10:15 p.m. Some hardy peepers and wood frogs did make their move on roads still wet from afternoon rain — we’ll post a field report after more counts trickle in and we’ve had some time to sort through them all — but the majority of last night’s movement likely happened after the storm, when we weren’t around to record it. If frogs did move en masse, their chorusing will tell the tale tonight!

Our next opportunities for nighttime rain are Wednesday and Thursday, though temperatures may be questionable both nights. Right now, Thursday looks warmer than Wednesday, so that might be the better night of the two, but it’s too soon to say for sure if either will be froggy. Stay tuned!

March 19, 2022

UPDATE at 4 p.m.: Tonight’s rain is now not forecast to arrive until 10 p.m. or so. If the ground is still wet at sunset from this afternoon’s showers, some amphibians could make their move in the early part of the evening, but the biggest pulse of amphibian activity will likely not occur until the next round of rain arrives — great news for the frogs, who will have far fewer cars to contend with, but less exciting for us, as we may not be awake to see them. If tonight’s rain is too late for you, sit tight, as there will certainly be more migration to come!

Warm rain is still in the forecast for tonight, so a migration seems likely, especially at low-elevation and south-facing sites! However, thunderstorms are in the forecast as well, and this requires extra caution. In addition to making sure you’re wearing a reflective vest and carrying a bright light for safety, if you hear thunder or see lightning at any point tonight, take shelter in your car immediately. The CDC and National Weather Service recommend staying indoors (or in your car) for 30 minutes following the last clap of thunder or lightning. Depending on how close your crossing site is to where you live, you might also want to head home and wait out the storm there.

If you head out in search of amphibians tonight, we’d love to hear what you find out there. Please submit your counts and photos via the online forms here. As a reminder, although we accept crossing data from throughout New Hampshire, we’ll only be sharing data from the greater Monadnock Region in our field reports. If you live outside the Monadnock Region, it may make more sense to submit your counts to a different program; you can learn more about that here.

The North Lincoln Street crossing site in Keene will be closed to vehicles tonight, and Jordan Road in Keene will be closed to through-traffic as well. Critter counts and spot pattern photographs will continue at both sites − in part so we can report on how many amphibians benefited from the road closures. Although families and other community members are generally welcome to visit the North Lincoln Street crossing site when that road is closed, given tonight’s chance of thunderstorms, it’s probably safest to sit this one out. (Don’t worry: there will be more migration nights to come!) In addition, we ask that only trained Salamander Crossing Brigade volunteers in proper safety attire come to the Jordan Road crossing. You can find more information on the Keene amphibian detours here.

March 17, 2022

The faintest trickle of migration began last night in Keene, with a handful of wood frogs and spring peepers making their move in mist, after late afternoon showers. Unless the weather forecast changes significantly between now and tomorrow night, what began as a trickle on Thursday could turn into a flood on Saturday! With Friday’s temperatures in the 60s and rain most of the day and into the evening on Saturday, Saturday looks very promising for our first Big Night of the region at low-elevation and south-facing sites — and, after today’s thaw, higher-elevation sites might see some amphibian movement as well. As we all know, weather forecasts can change dramatically from day to day, so check back tomorrow to be sure — but, in the meantime, best to dig out your reflective vest and put fresh batteries in your flashlight!

March 17, 2022

Showers are likely this afternoon, but are expected to taper off around sunset. (As of 9 a.m., the forecast calls for 40% chance of showers between 7 and 9 p.m., with no rain after that.) If the ground is still wet after dark, we could see our first amphibian movement of the year tonight. However, once the ground dries, any amphibian activity will likely slow.

If it’s wet after nightfall where you are and you’re eager to see the first frogs of the year, don your reflective vest, grab your flashlight, and head on out to see if amphibians are afoot! Before you go, be sure to check out what’s new with the Crossing Brigades in 2022, and review these helpful reminders for Big Nights. If you do go out, we’d love to hear what you find out there — even if it’s nothing. You can submit your counts and photos here.

If you’re hoping for more of a sure thing, keep your eye on Saturday. The forecast could certainly change between now and then, but at the moment, Saturday looks very promising for a Big Night!

March 16, 2022

A few intrepid Crossing Brigadiers headed out to our Keene crossing sites in last night’s rain, but didn’t see a single frog! Aboveground conditions were perfect, but the ground must not have been sufficiently thawed. Although there are several chances for evening showers in the next few nights, Saturday looks the most promising for a migration. Stay tuned!

March 15, 2022

Salamander season begins in earnest this week, with several possibilities for warm, nighttime rain. The first such chance is tonight, when rain is expected to begin just after sunset. The big question is whether the ground will have had enough time to thaw after the weekend snowstorm. At many sites, the answer is no — but it’s less clear-cut at low-elevation sites where the ground has been bare for more than a day, like North Lincoln Street in Keene. (Although wood frogs can thaw in as few as four hours, it takes about a day for them to fully rouse.)

Tonight also happens to be the night of our Salamander Crossing Brigade volunteer training for this year, which means many of our volunteers (and project leaders) will be otherwise occupied. If you have not yet been trained, I’d encourage you to attend the workshop. If you are a returning volunteer who knows the Big Night ropes and you live near a crossing site with thawed ground, it can’t hurt to put fresh batteries in your flashlight, don your reflective vest, and head out to see if amphibians are afoot! Before you go, be sure to check out what’s new with the Crossing Brigades in 2022, and review these helpful reminders for Big Nights. If you do go out, we’d love to hear what you find out there — even if it’s nothing. You can submit your counts and photos here.

We’re also keeping our eyes on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday. Thursday’s forecast calls for showers right around sunset, but will they linger long enough to spur amphibians to action? After a week of warming and with Friday’s daytime temperatures in the 60s, rain on either weekend night sounds more promising. Right now, Friday’s rain is not expected to arrive until after midnight — sad news for us, but great news for the frogs, who will have far fewer cars to contend with. At the moment, wet weather is expected to continue through Saturday night, which could be our first early-evening Big Night of the year. Of course, all of that could change by the time the weekend rolls around. Stay tuned!

March 14, 2022

Salamander season begins in earnest this week, with several possibilities for warm, nighttime rain. The first such chance is Tuesday, when rain is expected to begin just after sunset. The big question for Tuesday is whether the ground will have had enough time to thaw after the weekend snowstorm. It’s possible, but by no means a sure thing. (Although wood frogs can thaw in as few as four hours, it takes about a day for them to fully rouse.)

Tuesday also happens to be the night of our Salamander Crossing Brigade volunteer training for this year, which means many of our volunteers (and project leaders) will be otherwise occupied. If you have not yet been trained, I’d encourage you to attend the workshop on Tuesday. If you are a returning volunteer who knows the Big Night ropes and you live near a crossing site with thawed ground, it can’t hurt to put fresh batteries in your flashlight, don your reflective vest, and head out to see if amphibians are afoot! Before you go, be sure to check out what’s new with the Crossing Brigades in 2022, and review these helpful reminders for Big Nights. If you do go out, we’d love to hear what you find out there — even if it’s nothing. You can submit your counts and photos here.

We’re also keeping our eyes on Friday and Saturday. After a week of warming and with Friday’s daytime temperatures in the 60s, rain either night could usher in the first significant migration of the season. Right now, Friday’s rain is not expected to arrive until after midnight — sad news for us, but great news for the frogs, who will have far fewer cars to contend with. Right now, wet weather is expected to continue through Saturday night, which could be our first true Big Night of the year. Of course, all of that could change by the time the weekend rolls around. Stay tuned!

February 23, 2022

Had they taken place later in the season, last night’s temperatures and heavy rains would have spelled a Big Night, but a small crew patrolled North Lincoln Street in Keene and didn’t see a single frog. It seems the ground was still too frozen. Friday’s snowstorm ought to return us to our regularly-scheduled winter, so check back again in mid- to late March for the first forecasts of spring!

February 21, 2022

Much of the Monadnock Region is still blanketed by snow, as it should be in February. However, last Thursday’s deluge melted what was left of the snowpack at some low-elevation sites, such as North Lincoln Street and Eastern Avenue in Keene and Forest Lake Road in Winchester. The big question is whether the ground at those sites has thawed enough to spur amphibians to action in tomorrow’s near-certain rain. (Although wood frogs can thaw in as few as four hours, it takes about a day for them to fully rouse.) If the ground at those sites has thawed sufficiently, it’s possible we could see our first amphibian movement of the year tomorrow night. Our earliest recorded wood frog migration took place on February 25, 2017. If there’s a migration tomorrow — even a very small one — it will set a new record.

Since this is very early for a migration, we’re still getting everything in order for this year’s salamander season. (For instance, our training for new volunteers won’t take place for another three weeks!) However, if you’ve volunteered with the Salamander Crossing Brigades in the past, live near North Lincoln Street or another crossing site whose hillside is snow-free, and are itching to see the first frogs of 2022, put fresh batteries in your flashlight, don your raingear and reflective vest, and head out after dark to see if amphibians are afoot. If you do, we’d love to hear what you find. (You can submit your counts and photos here.)

IMPORTANT NOTE: North Lincoln Street will not be closed to traffic, so trained Crossing Brigadiers in proper safety attire only, please.

Contact Us

To volunteer or for more information, please contact Brett Amy Thelen at (603) 525-3394 or by email.